Thursday, September 4, 2014

Filling holes and Painting Trim

While the boys are working on the heavy lifting, I get to do some of the detail work.  My goal is to get the half bath on the first floor done.  Remember that dirty patriotic one from the update? Yea- that one.  Don't remember? You're in luck- you'll get plenty of before pics later on in this post.
So first up is to clean it *shiver* and then fill holes, caulk, and finally paint.  This home had a lot of holes to fill.  It's a simple process.  Remove any drywall anchors, sand the hole smooth, smear in the joint compound, and sand again.  Caulking is absolutely optional.  I really like the look when baseboards and other trim have been caulked, but to each their own. 
This is joint compund.  Think heavy pancake batter that you have only added half the recommended water to.  It's cheap, it doesn't smell bad, and it works great.
This is the brand we got.  It worked great but I haven't tried many others.  
This is a sanding block.  My sandpaper attaches like velcro and stays put wonderfully! Highly recommended if you have a lot of sanding to do. *Note- If you get a block like this, you have to buy the sandpaper specifically made for that block.*


So this is a hole in my laundry room.  It's ugly and I would like a smooth wall when I eventually paint.  So I sanded it. Toss some joint compound in a mud pan and grab a putty knife to spread it.





Load a little mud (joint compound) on your knife and spread, filling the hole. Then scrape away any excess.  Once it's dry, sand it again.  If it still isn't smooth, either add more joint compound or cry over more sanding. 


The half bath had wallpaper on one wall.   Despite our best efforts, that wall got TORN UP removing the wallpaper.  Little tiny knicks everywhere.  Here it is after filling holes.  It looks like the room has a bad case of the chicken pox.
As you can see, I had already taped off the floor.  The hardwood is just too pretty to risk dripping paint on it.  The sink it 100ish years old and i didn't want to risk dripping on that either.  I taped off the toilet tank because it is almost impossible to paint behind the tank without getting paint on it.  There's just not enough space.

Then came picking paint.  Have you ever walked into a paint store and said "I just need white paint." and then tried to actually pick one?!  There are 4,345,618 colors of white paint (give or take 5).  After spending 30 minutes looking at almost white, almost pink, and kind of grayish white paint colors I settled on this.  Untinted.  Just plain pure white!  It's beautiful. 

I thought the door in the half bath was white and decided to check.  It wasn't.  Well, not my white anyway. 


Our house has this awesome chair rail throughout the entire first floor and up the stairs into the second.  It's gorgeous but needed a new coat of paint.  Or 3.  I expected white to easily cover white in 1 simple coat.  I would be wrong- I'm usually wrong.  It took 3 coats to really get it covered.  Since any other paint color will cover white, I didn't tape off the trim.  When I paint the wall color, it will cover the extra paint. 





So that's where I leave you.  Holes filled, trim painted.


3 comments:

  1. My teenage son and his friends got a little carried away in their rough housing, and punched a hole into my wall. I didn't want to hire somebody to come fix it, so I've been trying to see if it was at all possible for me to fix it myself. This tutorial makes it look extremely easy, and it doesn't cost that much to buy the material to fix it. I'll have to get to work as soon as possible to get that wall all patched up and looking as good as new.
    Drywall Repair

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